Friday, December 27, 2013

From Our Nutritionist: 5 New Years Resolutions You Can Actually Stick To

"Don't you just love New Years? You can start all over. Everyone gets a second chance." - Forrest Gump

courtesy of someecards.com


Everyone does it - "This year I am going to give up dessert completely!" "This year I am going to go to the gym every single day!" "This year I am going to get up early and make a green juice every day!" - but most of us find it hard to stick to resolutions that are drastic changes in our lifestyle.  So how about making a few small changes that can put you on the path to where you want to be?





Here are Allison's top 5 suggestions for do-able New Years Resolutions:

courtesy of: cleanwateraction.org

1.) Drink more water! Every system in your body relies on water to function properly. This is one of the easiest changes for most people to incorporate into their day-to-day routine. So how much do you actually need? Everyone thinks of the 8 glasses a day rule, but The Institute of Medicine determined that an adequate intake (AI) for men is roughly 3 liters (about 13 cups) of total beverages a day. The AI for women is 2.2 liters (about 9 cups) of total beverages a day.



This year, why not try focusing on water and herbal teas instead of soda or other sugary beverages?

courtesy of myplate.gov


2.) Eat more plants! Thanks to Michael Pollan for introducing this phrase into the general lexicon! Most of us can benefit from eating more plants. Plant foods, like fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, are high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber. They also tend to be lower in calorie while being more nutrient dense, making them a great choice to fill up on if you're looking to cut calories. The USDA's MyPlate actually offers excellent guidance by suggesting that you make a full 1/2 of your plate fruits and veggies at each meal!







courtesy of prevention.com

3.) Incorporate more movement into your day, every day. Your body was built to be in motion, and most of us are stuck at a desk everyday. Try taking a few minutes each hour to move a little bit- whether it is a walk to the bathroom or some stretches in your chair. Here are some fun and easy ways to incorporate more movement into your day:




  • get off the subway one stop before your stop and walk the rest of the way
  • take the stairs instead of the escalator or elevator
  • walk over to your buddy's cubicle to talk INSTEAD of instant messaging or calling them
  • walk around the block twice on your lunch break.


courtesy of blogs.scientificamerican.com


4.) Learn to Meditate! A growing body of scientific evidence supports the health benefits of meditation that include reducing negative emotions and building skills to manage your stress. Urban Mindfulness has compiled a list of meditation centers in NYC along with reviews, and there are several places that you can learn to meditate and practice for free!








courtesy of forbes.com
5.) Eat Less Sugar! Sugar impacts your immune system, is full of empty calories and most of us eat way too much. The average american consumes about 130 pounds of sugar EACH YEAR! Some simple ways to reduce your sugar intake:
  • Switch from soda to naturally flavored carbonated water
  • Switch to plain, unsweetened yogurt and add your own fruit if you need a little sweetness
  • Read labels! Many foods have much more sugar than you might expect - I've seen yogurts that have 35 grams of sugar in one serving! That is almost as much as what's in a 12 oz coca-cola. 
  • Avoid fancy coffee drinks - they're often loaded with sugar and sugar syrups.

See? That wasn't too bad, was it? Remember that a few simple changes can add up to a big difference. 

Allison has a Masters Degree in Nutrition and is a NYS licensed certified dietitian-nutritionist. 

Please note that this blog contains only my opinions - none of this information is intended to be a replacement for that of other health professionals.


Please note: All health care issues of a medical nature must be discussed with a physician. Nutritionists are not physicians, and my advice does not replace that of a physician. Suggestions made by nutritionists are non-medical and not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. - See more at: http://www.allisonbuckinghamnutrition.com/approach#sthash.nNPRKOSK.dpuf

Please note: All health care issues of a medical nature must be discussed with a physician. Nutritionists are not physicians, and my advice does not replace that of a physician. Suggestions made by nutritionists are non-medical and not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. - See more at: http://www.allisonbuckinghamnutrition.com/approach#sthash.nNPRKOSK.dpuf

 

Please note: All health care issues of a medical nature must be discussed with a physician. Nutritionists are not physicians, and my advice does not replace that of a physician. Suggestions made by nutritionists are non-medical and not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. - See more at: http://www.allisonbuckinghamnutrition.com/approach#sthash.nNPRKOSK.dpuf
Please note: All health care issues of a medical nature must be discussed with a physician. Nutritionists are not physicians, and my advice does not replace that of a physician. Suggestions made by nutritionists are non-medical and not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. - See more at: http://www.allisonbuckinghamnutrition.com/approach#sthash.nNPRKOSK.dpuf
Please note: All health care issues of a medical nature must be discussed with a physician. Nutritionists are not physicians, and my advice does not replace that of a physician. Suggestions made by nutritionists are non-medical and not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. - See more at: http://www.allisonbuckinghamnutrition.com/approach#sthash.nNPRKOSK.dpuf

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